There is No Evil

igbokweazoguchukwuemekaDecember 6, 2021

There is no evil

review
Review by Marina Ashioti
Share this
Directed by
Mohammad Rasoulof
Starring
Baran Rasoulof Mohammad Seddighimehr Zhila Shahi
Defying a 20-year filmmaking ban, the Iranian auteur made his seventh feature in secret.

Potent and unsettling shorts portrayed with meandering pace.

The film’s political importance is explored with a sincerity that outweighs it shortcomings.

Share this
Share this
This anthology film from director Mohammad Rasoulof explores the social consequences of Iran’s death penalty.
Unfolding across four divergent stories, Mohammad Rasoulof’s Golden Bear-winning anthology film There is No Evil presents a potent tapestry of perspectives informed by capital punishment in present-day Iran. Rather than being caught between poetry and censorship, Rasoulof strays from the stronghold of allegorical aesthetics and instead adopts a necessary and uncompromising antagonism against governmental oppression with fearless narrative urgency.
Each short is emotionally draining in its portrayal of the personal responsibility of executioners against a backdrop of authoritarian rule. Depictions of complex family dynamics, mandatory military conscription and corrupt state practices work in tandem to create a textured understanding of violence and its banality, of its immersion in the quotidian and the mundane.
The first two vignettes are captivating and thrilling, making the chest tighten with anxiety, while the didactic dialogue of the third and fourth shorts falter in focus and tonally complicate the whole. Despite an excessive 150-minute runtime, a fair share of abrupt tonal shifts and a somewhat heavy-handed execution of metaphors threatening to rob the anthology of power and cohesion, the dramatically consistent depictions of contempt, grief and rage bring an adequate sense of uniformity.
Published 2 Dec 2021
Share this
Tags: Mohammad Rasoulof There is No Evil
Defying a 20-year filmmaking ban, the Iranian auteur made his seventh feature in secret.

Potent and unsettling shorts portrayed with meandering pace.

The film’s political importance is explored with a sincerity that outweighs it shortcomings.

LWLies 91: The Titane issue – On sale now!
In defence of Darren Aronofsky’s The Fountain
House of Gucci review – Haute couture Arrested Development
Ryusuke Hamaguchi: ‘I’ve shot lot of stuff in cars because of Godard’
How The Beatles’ Magical Mystery Tour pioneered the visual album
By Patrick Gamble
Behtash Sanaeeha and Maryam Moghaddam’s drama takes a dim view of Iran’s discriminatory justice system.
festivals Berlin Film Festival
By Sarah Jilani
Despite facing severe restrictions Iran’s most important filmmakers continue to give its people a voice.
festivals Fajr International Film Festival
By Hannah Strong
This stylish first feature from Greek writer/director Christos Nikou fails to build on its intriguing premise.
review

Little White Lies was established in 2005 as a bi-monthly print magazine committed to championing great movies and the talented people who make them. Combining cutting-edge design, illustration and journalism, we’ve been described as being “at the vanguard of the independent publishing movement.” Our reviews feature a unique tripartite ranking system that captures the different aspects of the movie-going experience. We believe in Truth & Movies.

source

Categories

Leave a comment

Name *
Add a display name
Email *
Your email address will not be published